Tag Archive for Jack Daniel’s Running Formula

Consistent Loopiness at the USATF 50K Road Championships

50K

A big draw to the Caumsett 50K is the fact the race doubles as the USATF 50KM Road Championships.

My first race of the year would be an ultra. That’s largely due to deciding to pass on focusing on the Boston Marathon as I have done the past four years. I guess I’m just not a streaker anymore! (Runner slang for consecutive days running or repeat racing, not the other type of running with no clothes on). With the ‘freedom’ of no marathon to train for, I knew the calendar of winter race options was my oyster. Talking of oysters, I ended up turning my attention to a local race, not so far from Oyster Bay. A road 50K in Caumsett State Park (which doubles as the far more glamorous title of the USATF 50K Road Championships race) was my choice. It’s a race that’s been on my radar for a few years and now seemed the right time to give it a go.

I begun training at the start of December which felt odd to me starting my 2015 campaign in 2014. I’ve never trained through the Holiday season and I knew that would be a tough phase to get through without losing focus. I was slightly lost how to go about training for a 50K road race with a firm emphasis on the word ‘road’. All of my previous 50K’s have been on trails, some gnarlier than others, but all without too much fixation on pace or goal time. I would have to hang my head if this wasn’t going to be a PR day.

RUN SMART PROJECT

A Scientific Approach To Becoming A Faster Runner

I knew this race could be almost run like a marathon, just slightly less gas to save the engine for another 5+ miles. But I just didn’t have any great knowledge of how to train for it. Luckily, my good friends at The Run Smart Project do and they customized a nice 3-month plan for me. Through the winter months, I found some excuses to not run every run prescribed, something I’ve never really had much trouble with before. Whether it was because training in December in NYC is hard (the park is dead), my travel schedule involved two trips to Europe (not complaining) or I just wanted to stay home and play with our new Weimaraner puppy, Miles, instead of facing the cold winter nights I’m not sure. But most of the time I did layer up and train and put in good, not great speed workouts.

Pre-Juno

Full on training mode in Central Park while the rest of the city hunkered down pre-winter storm Juno.

The training plan gives a predicted goal time (if you follow it precisely) and mine for March 1st read 3:22 goal time. I knew my fitness level was not there (it would have meant a marathon PR en route FYI) so I played a more cautious approach of aiming for a window between 3:30-40 which was in the 7-min pace range. I was hopeful but not convinced that was where I was, which I shared with my friend Ken Posner pre-race. I was however convinced that my 4:33 50K PR was about to be taken down though!

Ten 5K loops awaited me on a course I knew little about. I had chatted with Ian Torrence and Emily Harrison about this race a year ago and they said it was “definitely not flat”. I didn’t know exactly how to interpret that but was about to find out.

I asked around for information about what drinks were on the course but couldn’t seem to find a consistent answer. Bremen told me he thought it was Hammer which is low on sugar compared to other brands and therefore low on my list (sorry Hammer). I jammed four Honey Stinger gels into my gloves and tights and had more in my bag if I really needed to come back and reload. I had made a rookie diabetes mistake of trying to calibrate a new sensor for my CGM in the morning but the calibration hadn’t finished in time so carrying it was now worthless. The plus side of this mini disaster was that I had room for some more gels! The glass is always half full as a diabetic athlete : )

gfsgfsdgfsf

8:30am on a cold day. Nothing better to do than start running! Photo credit: GLIRC

We took off in the bitter cold and I found myself letting a large number of male elites bomb ahead as I settled into a sub-7 pace alongside the returning female champ and course record holder, Emily Harrison. She had run a 3:17 last year so I quickly decided to ease up some more and try to relax into an honest pace.

The first mile was flat and then a long downhill, mile two, uphill and some rollers and the last mile went past the finish chute on and out and back lollipop loop which unfortunately involved lots of ice sections and cold puddles. I have nothing wrong with getting dirty but wasn’t this a national championship road race? This section was definitely the biggest challenge and hard to maintain a good pace.

By now, I had figured out that Gatorade was the electrolyte drink of choice on the course every 1.55 mile or so. With this really great news, I was able to quickly recalculate how and when to consume my carbs. Being that the type of race was not dissimilar to a marathon (where I don’t check my CGM often), I opted for my ‘every even mile’ carb intake approach.

gfgf

Fully focused on pace and monitoring my body. Photo credit: GLIRC

I ran lap 1 in sub-21 and felt that was probably slightly aggressive. The elites remained a bunch of five slowly stretching the gap on me (and others), Emily and Phil McCarthy ran separately ahead of me and I sat solo with a bunch of ten guys in hot pursuit to my rear.

I’m not sure how to ‘jazz up’ 10 x 5K loops but it was surprisingly far from boring. This is coming from the ‘I don’t do loop races’ guy. The repetitiveness of loops made the race a mathematical game for me. Lap after lap I was running consistent sub-21’s (I did not slow down after all) so I could predict the clock time down to a few seconds. As I passed by a really inspiring buddy of mine, Ken Tom, he said to me I made it look easy but I joked back “wait until lap 8”. But lap 8 eventually came and my pace did not waver. I am not trying to downplay the race or the distance. An ultra is hard, heck marathons are hard, running is hard. But today I locked in a pace and maintained it really well. I think I have to thank the monotony of loops for that.

fvff

On the hunt in the second half of the race. Photo credit: GLIRC

Once I had finally caught and passed Phil McCarthy at the halfway mark, I knew I had to keep pushing on and swallow some more runners up if I was going to make an indent on the Top 10 USATF results board. I never actually knew my place but knew I was likely on the outside looking in. But to keep me in check of how this was all going, I got then got lapped by eventual winner Zachary Ornelas (Sketchers) before I could complete lap 6. I ate humble pie big time! He was flying.

Due to the course, especially the last section, it was obvious to see which guys ahead were my targets. All of my focus was on closing that gap. The only other thing I had to think about timing my next Gatorade or Honey Stinger.

Lap seven went by, same gap. Lap eight completed, same gap. Lap nine, same gap. Whatever my place, it seemed locked in. The two guys ahead were not slowing down. What was pretty cool about the second to last lap was running through the timed mat to collect an official marathon time. I saw my watch flip to 2:55 on the nose as I came by. Nothing spectacular but it made me smile as that was first ever sub-3 in NY state (I have a long-term goal of going sub-3 in 50 states). On the same lap, I did manage to un-lap myself from third place which did nothing for my overall place and then caught Emily Harrison which did nothing for my Top 10 USATF overall men place. But what it did do was show me, I was running strong while others were fading.

gffff

Stop for nothing. I was locked in to consistent lap times and felt strong every time. Photo credit: GLIRC

On the final loop, I pushed and pushed just in case I could catch someone but my pace stayed at 6:35. My body was telling me this is it buddy, shouldn’t have skipped those workouts in December!The uphills now really beat my legs up (although they were gradual gradients or short rollers). I was going to sneak a peek at the finish clock before my final out and back section to see if I would make sub-3:30 but I already knew that goal was locked in so just ran, and ran hard through to the finish in a time of 3:27, a nice 66 minute PR!

Bremen, who ran the 25K (2nd place!), met me at the finish as snow was now coming down and I soon quickly realized how cold it had been out there. A giant blanket donated from him and some tomato soup was just the ticket I needed. I was content with my performance (almost as good as my post-race blood glucose!). I had to be. I got out of it what I put into it.

gfgfd

Post-race friends hangout: Bremen, Ken Tom, Lucimar, Keila, Phil and Ken. A lot of cool war stories between this group! Photo credit: Keila Merino

At the awards, I had my fingers crossed that I had pulled off 10th USATF place but alas, I was short by two; 13th overall, 12th USATF with an average pace of 6:41. As the snowstorm continued, I hung out with my amazing ultra friends, grabbed some lunch and packed up shop before the storm got any worse. It was such a great race to be running with the likes of Keila, Zandy, Trishul and Ian Torrence and those mentioned earlier.  Running and friends. Oh, for the simple life.

A huge thank you to the Run Smart Project for my custom plan. I surprised myself with how well I ran but know I can still improve dramatically at this distance and surface. Top 10 next year? We will see.

jgghgj

Consistent 5K splits. My marathon time was 2:55; first official sub-3 marathon for the state of NY!

Dashing Through NYC

My third ever 5K!

Me and the 5K have a very short history. A 19:02 from 2007 and an 18:24 from earlier this year. Technically, my fastest 5K is not even logged in the archives because it happened during a longer race.

Less than two months after running my furthest ever distance of 200 miles around Lake Tahoe, I wanted to challenge myself once again at the other end of the spectrum. I had two goals for the race. PR and break the 18-minute barrier.

I spent the majority of September off my feet trying to wrap my head around what I had just experienced and accomplished in Tahoe. When I did choose to run, I followed no agenda, either logging a 4 miler or a 20, nothing in between it seemed. My legs were jelly with zero speed but on the plus side, I knew I could run for hours on them still if I so chose.

Quickly enough though, October rolled around and I realized there was that 5K race I’d signed up for, now only one month away. To say I was in no shape for it was an understatement.  I decided to meet up with my longtime training partner, Gary Berard, for his speed workout in his final preparation for the Chicago Marathon.

The pre-meet up text read “2E, 2M, 2T, 2M, 2E”. This is the language of Coach Jack Daniel’s to which we abide for our marathon training. Decoded, E stands for easy pace, M, marathon pace and T, threshold pace. The 2 in this instance stood for the miles.

Going from the occasional slow run to this workout may have been a little extreme in hindsight, especially considering Gary was in peak condition. Needless to say, by two miles of marathon pace, I was barely hanging on to him. Mile 3 was an achievement in itself just to make it and by halfway through mile 4, I was keeled over in defeat as Gary continued up the hill in perfect form towards what would ironically be the finish line of my 5K race. Failing a workout is never fun but it was the wake up call I needed.

Daniels BOOK

The Runner’s Bible

I retreated home, showered, complained to Tiffany how I was way out of my depth and then grabbed my Jack Daniel’s book flipping to the 5K training pages that unsurprisingly, were in immaculate condition (you should see the marathon section). The 5K training plan started 16 weeks out and here I was beginning my plan with only 4 of them left to summon something up. I simply decided that was to be my training plan and dove straight into it.

Naysayers told me this was wrong, you should do this or you should do that. Most actually laughed in my face when I confessed I was training for a 5K. I think that’s a compliment to my ultrarunning endeavors. But the truth is, no one I spoke to or even Google knew how to go from 200 miles to 3.1 so here I quote Frank Sinatra because “I did it my way”.

Over those next four weeks, I traded my very well-trained slow twitch muscle fibers for fast twitch muscle fibers with up to three speed workouts a week, clocking 40 miles a week. In comparison, I train at about 90 miles a week with one speed workout for ultras. I did my training completely solo, largely because all my other friends were gearing up for the New York City Marathon the day following my race.

Every speed workout got a little better with a little less effort (except for those Friday morning 5:28 interval repeats. They sucked!) But by the end of October, I knew I was in way better shape to take on the clock and finish my race in 17-something. My mini training program was done, it was now showtime in the best city for just that.

NYRR Dash to the Finish Line 5K

NYRR Dash to the Finish Line 5K course map

With the race on my doorstep, the logistics couldn’t have been any easier. I woke up at 6:15am to the sound of raindrops, threw on some sweats and left HQ to go and get milk so I could eat my cereal two hours prior to the race start (8:30am). From the Food Emporium to Whole Foods to Duane Reade, everything was closed and I thought New York was the city that never sleeps. My logistics just got harder. A random deli was my savior in the end with the added bonus of a coffee and banana and back home I ran to get out of the rain. It wasn’t pretty out. My blood glucose levels were pretty however. They were right on cue all the way up to dropping a bag off in Central Park (the finish). From there, I zigzagged my way south and east across to the start at the United Nations building on 1st Avenue getting in an easy mile or so warm up. The weather was cold but the rain had eased somewhat, but by no means where these ideal conditions to run on slippery roads. At least it was looking somewhat better than the predicted high winds forecast for the main attraction on Sunday. I hung out with Brian Rosetti of The Run Smart Project (think Jack Daniel’s coaching online) at the start and we caught up waiting for the gun.

The midtown course is one for the sightseers for sure from the UN building, across 42nd Street past Grand Central Station, the Public Library at Bryant Park and now looking straight at the lights of Times Square in the distance. A ninety degree turn right on 6th Avenue aka Avenue of the Americas is a straight shoot to Central Park past Radio City Hall and the ‘LOVE’ symbol before winding right past The Plaza Hotel and up the southeast entrance into the park before doing a half lower loop clockwise up to the impressive and heavily marketed NYC Marathon finish line, hence the name of the race; Dash to the Finish Line 5K.

The race draws in people from all over the world because of the marathon. Friends and family not logging 26.2 miles on Sunday usually do this race as well as hardcore marathoners as their shake out run. However, the most competitive runners of them all are the local elites who are 5K, track specialists with lean bodies and flatter than flat racing shoes from the likes of NYAC (New York Athletic Club) and CPTC (Central Park Track Club). Standing in the corral being ushered forward to the start line a few rows back, I had no idea if I was standing too close to these types but screw it, here I was pretending to be just like them.

Off to the races. The elites lead us out down 1st Avenue. Photo credit: NYRR

Off to the races. The elites lead us out down 1st Avenue. Photo credit: NYRR

They say the first mile of the 5K should be the easiest and although I respected whoever ‘they’ are, I didn’t want to be fighting for space along 42nd Street. I knew that my true competition was myself and staying on pace to run between a 17:29-59 window was going to be my biggest challenge.

Past Grand Central a half mile in. Photo credit: NYRR

Past Grand Central a half mile in. Photo credit: NYRR

The mile one marker hid just out of sight after the turn up 6th Avenue so when my GPS clocked me at 4:41, I knew better than to think that was an amazing change of pace from training runs. GPS and NYC do not play well together. And so, as I did my turn with the upmost care on the wet roads I saw the mile 1 marker and took note of my watch once more showing me at 5:35.

Having run the course midweek, I decided that mile two was my ‘push mile’ because it was the flattest. I was ready to go up a gear now but I didn’t plan on getting a gust of wind in my face. A pack of six or so ran twenty yards ahead and I envied those sitting on the back of that. I looked around for a screen and all I saw were female runners half my size cranking away not giving a damn about trying to block the wind. It was time to man up!

Running west along mile 1. Photo credit: NYRR

I felt solid up the long stretch, my watch pace was more or less useless to me and so I went back to what Ian Sharman had drummed into me all Summer and focused on running on feel. I know what 5:15 feels like (horrid) and I know what 6 flat feels like (too easy for this situation) so I had to trust my running knowledge and try and stay locked in at 5:30 or so pace.

Just before the right turn into Central Park south, my friend Gary, who rightly gave me a whooping four weeks prior was out with his umbrella in the early hours of Saturday cheering me on. I knew now was the time to give it everything. A slight downhill to the corner of the park and mile 2 would be done. Two volunteers stood perfectly in front of the time clock which was probably not their actual job. Never the less, I caught a late glimpse of it reading 11:22. The wind up 6th Avenue had slowed me down more than I bargained for I guess.

With two uphills and one down remaining in the park now, I was pretty sure my 17:29 A goal was a wash (side note: Tiffany’s best college friend Fick, ran 17:30 in college and let me know about it leading up to the race!) Another great friend, Francis Laros was watching here and gave me my second boost of energy. I ran that first hill hard that I have run countless times over the years but never this hard. I passed a handful of runners now suffering apparently greater than me. I pretended to myself that the top was the end because I knew what followed was a long swooping downhill which we be somewhat of a recovery section.

I gave it everything now and was already beginning to regret not pushing even harder up 6th Avenue. But I knew of one thing for sure, and that was, this was going to be 17-something on the clock and I was on  my way to a PR.

0.5 left going for broke. Photo credit: Gary Berard

0.5 left going for broke. Photo credit: Gary Berard

Around Columbus Circle corner with a young buck by my side (later found it he was a 14-year old from the UK) and a girl from CPTC slightly ahead, I struggled to move clear of him and gain on her. A random spectator, ironically also from the UK, came to my aid with great words of encouragement “Come on! Back on your toes, catch her” It sounded like strange advice from a stranger but I decided to give it a go. To my amazement, I found not one but two higher gears with this change in my biomechanics and tore up that one last famous painful hill to the finish taking four or five more places in the process.

The huge electronic clock above the finish read 17-something and that’s all I knew or particularly cared about as I hung my arms over my legs in exactly the same way I had done so four weeks before. But this time, the feeling was achievement and not failure.

The final stats had me at 17:40 (5:41 pace) which put me in the top 100 of a field of almost 8,000. Later on that day, I reviewed my year of racing. This ended up being my 7th PR from 16 outings and somehow, this one was truly one of the most satisfying of them. Perhaps because I don’t consider myself to be a 5K runner, perhaps because I had just run 200 miles. Whatever the reason, I’m back in the park up to my old mischief in two weeks for the NYC 60K because what else would I rather be doing!

The Chicago Project – 7 weeks from 100 to 26.2

Let me begin by saying my weekend in Chicago with my best running friends (minus Frankie and Gary) was one of the most fun weekends I have ever had. That is what running should and will always be about for me. Spending time away from home with people I genuinely love and care about, supporting them with new PR’s and commiserating with them when missing them (a few celebratory drinks on Sunday was pretty fun too).

‘There’s an app for that.’ No seriously, the Chicago Marathon really did have an app.

For the first Chicago in years, the weather forecast was looking perfect. I didn’t know there was such a thing as a 15-day weather forecast but there most certainly is. “It’s worth a Google!” As the days, hours and minutes counted down (I downloaded the marathon app and watched it intensely!), the 10-day forecast, weekly and weekend never changed the prediction. The Windy City would be a low of 37 and a high of 53 with 11mph winds. Near perfect marathon weather.

My 2nd favorite city in the USA!

I went into this marathon just seven weeks after the exploits of Leadville 100, hence the title ‘The Chicago Project.’ How was I going to know how to train for a marathon after that? Who could tell me if I was right or wrong with my training?

People may ask why attempt a marathon so soon after 100 miles? Well, my reason for being in Chicago was purely for social reasons initially but then I decided to take the race more seriously. I thought why not try to use my new-found endurance level from Colorado and bring it across to a short, sweet and very unique 7-week marathon training program! Some call me crazy and I say thank you!

Week 1: I took the first week completely off. Well, almost. After five days of relaxing, I decided to get back at it on Saturday with an easy 10 miler. Relaxing felt completely alien to me. Do people really sit on the sofa all night? This is why the Type 2 Diabetes epidemic is so big (no pun intended), people are not exercising enough!

Week 2-4: I got back into five to six-day training cycles totaling 50-70 miles a week. Every week incorporated two-speed workouts from my go to ‘Jack Daniel’s Running Formula’. The one custom change I made, was to reduce the demanded fast pace to one gear less. For example, if the workout called for 20-minutes at 15K pace, I would do that at half-marathon pace. And if it called for half-marathon pace, I would do it a marathon pace and so on. This plan seemed to work pretty good. it helped me to avoid injury, improve confidence of my speed and to eventually having to stop staring at Rui and Francis’s bums as they were way faster than me at this point.

Week 5: or 3 weeks out, our main workout called for 22 miles at easy pace. For me this was 7:20 pace. As most of you know, the 22 became 26.2 at the Yonkers Marathon and the pace became 7:10’s to help my friend Gary BQ for 2013. Due to this extra endeavor, I again backed off the mileage before and after this run to compensate.

Week 6: The key workout was now upon us; a 15-mile speed workout. I managed to run this at 6:18 average pace but it literally killed me. If anyone saw a runner flat-out on the road in Central Park mid-September, that was probably me. When I analyzed my Garmin data, I knew I was right around 2:47 marathon shape. How could I be so sure? By comparing my present fitness to my marathon PR fitness. I compared the workout data to my first 15 miles of my Marine Corps Marathon PR of 2:45 from 2011. I ran the same pace but my heart rate data told me I wasn’t ‘as fit’. A body blow to my Chicago dream. I told myself  though that Chicago is a flat course and the race day adrenaline will push me through. Plus, Central Park is all hills and the workout was done on a lack of sleep. I decided to ignore the science and go with plan A anyway, PR the race. I was optimistic, it’s the only way for a diabetic to be!

Base Camp – across from the Start and Finish area at Grant Park

At 3:30am I woke up as did my roomie Rui. The alarm wasn’t set that early, we were staying at the Congress Hotel, right across the street from the start! Pure adrenaline woke us up and as much as we both tried to sleep, by 5am we were both up doing our pre-race routines. At 5:30, (2 hours before the race) it was time to eat breakfast. Blood glucose test; 333. Terrible! I had miscalculated my lasagna meal from dinner very badly. I wanted to be around 200. I ate a bagel, croissant and banana and pumped in an extra unit of insulin to try to drop the number down. I had to be careful though and not over adjust. Better to be high than low on race day but 333 was a joke.

We walked from the hotel into Grant Park shortly before 7am amongst the masses of 38,000 runners plus family, friends, police and marathon staff. It was crisp but not too cold. Our $2 CVS Pharmacy wooly hat and gloves and baggy hoodies were a bargain and worn with pride! We picked up these on Saturday as we all failed to bring throw away clothes. Marathon amateurs, the lot of us! One final blood test before dropping off my bag; 286. Still high. I dared not pump any more insulin in at this point. I trusted my original correction when I was 333 would eventually do the trick. I carried 4 Honey Stinger gels, two in my shorts, one in each arm sleeve – that’s what they are made for right? Game time.

The start of the 35th Chicago Marathon. 38,000 runners are off!

I wished my friends well as we separated to different parts of the corral A and B. Rui and myself headed front left as the first turn is….yes left. We are smart runners! The gun fired exactly at 7:30am and we were off. Part of this different feel real. I looked at my race chip and my bib and quickly made myself get in the zone. Now was the time to perform. Put the speed workouts from the last few weeks and my endurance into this final exam.

The first 5K of the course in the heart of the Windy City (with inaccurate GPS!)

Mile 1 from two years ago was way too fast. I got caught up in the excitement. Not so, this year, 6:23. Mile 2; 6:26. OK, this was OK I told myself, loads of miles to swing that around. Don’t panic. I hit the 5K at 19:48. Now panic! 54 seconds behind schedule. I was paying too much attention to my Garmin rather than the natural feel of 6:18 pace. The huge Chicago buildings were throwing the GPS way off and now, so was I. A mistake. I’ve run this course before, I should have known better than to trust my watch over my body. It was time to knuckle down.

Mile 3 – that Brooks guy in yellow looks stressed!

Now heading north for 4.5 miles I got into some sort of groove. It was all effort though, not smooth like Marine Corps felt. I asked myself ‘this shouldn’t be hurting so much, especially so early on.’ My heart rate was already at 166. Oh boy. Going to be a tough day out here, I just knew. Could it have gotten worse before it got better? Yes. A guy in a cow costume was ahead of me! I thought these nightmares of people in costumes were long gone since I got taken down by a tutu in the London Marathon 2004! After an embarrassingly long time, I finally passed the cow at 10K. I prayed to never see him again. But respect to the cow, he was moving!

We turned south back through Old Town just prior to mile 8. I was still behind my goal pace but I had cut the deficit, even with the wind in my face the whole time going north. But here we were, now running back to the city and the wind was still against us. A runner next to me said “This is not right. How can this be?” (in much stronger language). I agreed and then realized there was nothing we could do about it. We were already stretched out, in the top 500 or so, and the wind coverage was slim to none. You could hide behind the person in front but then you were running their pace, not yours. The only thing to do that could make this work seem like fun a this point? High five Elvis at mile 10. I remember him from 2010 and made it my duty to take a detour and give him a high-five. “Thank you very much” he said. Everyone loved it, no more than me.

Back over the bridge at Mile 12

Back in the heart of the city, the crowds were big and loud. I spotted the black RUN NYC singlet of Matt Woods. I was surprised to see him. He hadn’t trained particularly well for this race and told me he was just hoping to break 3-hours at best. When I got to him at mile 13, we exchanged pleasantries. I didn’t dare tell him we were on pace for 2:44! This may have been the only time in the race I felt OK. I was on pace for 2:44, maybe a 2:43 high if I could just execute 13 more miles at my current pace. I was now in a 6:10 zone which felt pretty good. The key now was focus through the middle miles.

At the charity cheer zone around mile 15, the focus went out of the window. I saw the Leukemia team and JDRF, two charities very close to my heart and decided to flap my arms in the air to get them cheering. They responded with huge noise. It was great fun and loosened me up a little.

With 9 miles to go, I was slowly falling apart. I took my second gel with caffeine, hoping it would get my energized. My Garmin’s data was so out of whack I wasn’t even following it. I was using 5K check points and doing the math in my head to see if I was ahead or behind PR time. My two-minute cushion at halfway was now almost down to one minute and my legs were screaming for mercy. My brain drifted into the past and reminded me I had only just run 100 miles and Yonkers Marathon. I had to work hard mentally to switch it off, leave the excuses for somebody else.

I decided I had to break those last 9 miles of intense pain into 3 mile chunks. My brain couldn’t cope with thinking about 9 more miles. As we headed south and I was looking forward to a loud and fun section of the course, China Town. Then we turned hard right and started heading west again. I had forgotten there were two sections that took us on these long west loops, not one. It made sense. We still had 9 miles to go, China Town was near the end. I kept plugging away, taking a Gatorade at every other aid station to keep my blood glucose levels topped up. I definitely questioned why I choose to be in such pain during these miles.

China Town – a great part of the course with GANGNAM STYLE!

Heading east once more in front of the magnificent Chicago skyline, China town was this time, definitely close. I heard Gangnam Style by PSY for one! I was now 5 miles from home. At this point, all pacing and heart rate numbers were out of the window. I knew the PR was still there but it would be really close now. I had tired on the second half like a true rookie. I turned the ninety degree left to head north on Michigan Avenue; the hardest finish to any marathon I know. Over two miles straight which feels like forever and ever.

The wind hit me once again and it was now at its strongest as I was at my weakest. I was gutting it out but my body was a mess.  All I had to do was slow down or stop and it would go away. The Ethiopian’s and Kenyan’s had won 40 minutes ago, why carry on? Why bother? Only runners can understand why we never quit, never take the easy road. My legs were absolutely trashed. My mile pace went up to 6:45’s here and my heart rate had sky rocketed to the mid-170’s. I was at my maximum output but running my slowest miles, it wasn’t pretty.

I turned right up the only significant hill of the course, absolutely exhausted. One final turn left at mile 26 and the finish shoot was in sight. I glanced at my watch knowing the PR was now touch and go. 2:45:58…..2:45:59…2:46:00…and it had gone just like that. I was crushed, almost heart-broken but not quite. I crossed the line 25 seconds slower than my 2011 PR, less than one second per mile slower.

2:46:23

Too most people, a 2:46 marathon is a fantastic time. I understand that, I truly and respectfully do. Saying that, I couldn’t hide my personal disappointment. My good friend Kevin Starkes witnessed my finish (he ran 2:43 only a week after his Hampton’s win in 2:39!). I tried to explain to him, I could have done it. He slammed me down for being hard on myself and simply said “You looked pretty dead crossing that line.” I needed to hear that, it was true. I put 100% in and came up just short. That’s all you can ask for. No regrets, no excuses.

Boston 2013, watch out, I’m coming for you with 16 weeks of training, not 7!

I quickly got over my near miss PR. My post-race glucose was 123 for starters! And then their was the free beer shared with all my friends in the Grant Park festival afterwards. Our day and night of celebration made Marathon Sunday another truly special day in my life. Thank you all for being part of it.

So many of my wonderful friends ran exceptional races out there on October 7th. Crushing PR’s and making exciting debuts. With over twenty of my NYC friends who ran it, I’ll keep this short and say the highlights of the day were Luke McCambley’s 2:37 debut marathon (I take full credit for making him sign up!) and Steven Beck’s 3:16 (18 minute PR)/staying out till 2am to PAR-TAY! Until Boston, peace.

Kevin 2:43, Luke 2:37 -DEBUT!!, Me and Rui 2:52 PR

%d bloggers like this: